George Dennis

paris2.jpg

George Dennis' photographs show a great eye for capturing mundane subject matters of every day life, with a talent of being able to bring inanimate objects around him to life that others may not notice. What also stood out the most to us is the combination of colours that he captures so well through his photography. We spoke to Dennis about being exposed to creativity from a young age, his style and aesthetic, and his plans of venturing into print.


Dennis currently works as an advertising creative who is based in Stoke Newington, London. Having grown up with creative parents, it is clear in his work that he has been exposed to the creative life from a young age. "My parents both work in creative industries (my dad's a director and my mum's an interior stylist). When I was younger I would often go on shoots/be on set, I think being in that kind of environment might have helped me develop a taste for it." We asked Dennis if he remembered the first photograph he took. "Not specifically but I do remember getting a shot of a yellow inflatable dock Canada floating undisturbed on glass like water in around 2008 and thinking that it was a pretty decent image." 

 

"I remember being excited at the idea that there was no barrier to entry in shooting good stuff, you just had to get out there and develop a magpie's eye for it."

 

paris1.jpg

"It was around 2012 that I started taking a serious interest in contemporary street photography. I had this sort of Damascene moment when I realised that exceptional images could be composed of really mundane subject matter, and that the skill really just lies in noticing stuff that others don't. I remember being excited at the idea that there was no barrier to entry in shooting good stuff, you just had to get out there and develop a magpie's eye for it. Visually speaking modern life is often a bit of a mess. If you look at the internet and the feed based structure of social media in particular, it's aesthetically chaotic. I suppose my style was in part a reaction to this. I like to focus in on isolated moments of calm and clarity." Although his work tends to be quite clean, Dennis is able to capture little details that would be otherwise easy to miss. Dennis admits that he is "usually drawn to graphic cartoon-like scenes where the boundaries between real life and imagination become a little blurred. I think this is partly a reaction to the onslaught of fairly dry imagery we are all exposed to on a daily basis."

DSCF5654.jpg

"Visually speaking modern life is often a bit of a mess. If you look at the internet and the feed based structure of social media in particular, it's aesthetically chaotic. I suppose my style was in part a reaction to this. I like to focus in on isolated moments of calm and clarity."

DSCF5748.jpg

Dennis is inspired by fellow creatives around him on Instagram. Some of his favourite accounts include the likes of @Andys_eyes, @seanlemoine, @Thisisnow_here, @casualtimetravel, @vishalparadigm, @ryhorosky to name just a few. "In terms of more established photographers, I think Viviane Sassen's work is incredible. Outside of contemporary stuff, I got switched on to Saul Leiter a couple of years ago and think his use of colour still feels very relevant." Dennis also mentioned enjoying the recent work of David Brandon's Geeting. "His latest book Amusement Park is a lot of fun and I really enjoy his neighbourhood stroll image series."

As for Dennis' future plans, he plans to head back to an Italian Island in the Tyrrhenian Sea called Ponza for a couple of weeks this summer. "Last time I was out there I took some of my favourite shots, so hopefully that trip will prove productive again. I get a real kick out of seeing my stuff in print magazines so hopefully that will continue to happen. I’ve made tentative steps towards putting together my own zine. Hopefully I’ll print one at some point early next year. I'd love to exhibit some work further down the line too."

calpebroom2.jpg
battenburgwall.jpg
Calpe2.jpg
calpe4.jpg